• When to take your baby to the ER

    For parents, knowing when to take a baby to the ER can be difficult. As a general guideline, seek out children’s emergency care any time you feel concerned about your baby’s symptoms. It is better to find out that your baby’s symptoms aren’t being caused by a medical emergency than to wait and see what happens, only to find out that your child needs urgent care. If you are weighing your options, here are some of the circumstances in which you should take your baby to the ER right away.

    Fever

    Fevers are scary for parents, and while older kids can often be treated with home care when they have a fever, babies should generally be seen by a pediatrician. If your baby has a rectal temperature higher than 100.4 F when he or she is two months of age or younger, go to the ER for treatment.

    In older babies, you can usually wait to see a pediatrician, unless your baby has other symptoms, such as excessive crying or lethargy.

    Vomiting

    Newborns should get ER treatment whenever they vomit. In older babies, green vomit indicates a need for emergency care. As the video explains, projectile vomiting can suggest a structural problem in the stomach that could require emergency care.

    Other episodes of vomiting can be judged on a case-by-case basis. The real danger of vomiting is dehydration, so look for warning signs like dry diapers and crying without tears, and get emergency care if you suspect your baby needs fluids.

    Breathing Problems

    People of all ages should get emergency care when they have breathing problems, and babies are no different. If your baby is wheezing, is having visible chest retractions or has skin that is blue-tinged, go to the ER for a diagnosis. Your baby may also need emergency care if he or she makes a high-pitched noise when breathing.

    The compassionate children’s emergency care team in Las Vegas at Sunrise Children’s Hospital provides fast, conscientious care designed with kids in mind. Don’t play guessing games with your baby’s health. Visit our ER for immediate care or call (702) 233-5437 for a pediatrician referral.

  • Should You Dial 9-1-1 or Drive Your Child to the ER?

    Young kids tend to assume that their parents have all the answers, but quite often, it’s difficult to know what to do when a medical emergency occurs. There are many situations in which you could drive your child to the ER, but potentially life-threatening problems are not among them. When you call 911, the children’s hospital can send out emergency care responders to give your child life-saving care before he or she reaches the hospital. Here at Sunrise Children’s Hospital in Las Vegas, we urge parents to err on the side of caution and activate emergency services when a child’s health is in jeopardy.

    Call 911 if respiratory distress occurs.

    Respiratory distress refers to trouble breathing, which is always a medical emergency. Respiratory distress can be caused by an asthma attack, allergic reaction, choking, or pneumonia. Emergency responders can give your child oxygen while transporting him or her to the children’s hospital.

    Drive to the ER for minor broken bones.

    Kids tend to play as though they were invincible and unfortunately, this often results in broken bones. In many cases, parents can drive their kids to the ER for broken bones. If the child is unconscious or appears dazed, has also sustained head trauma, experiences excruciating pain, or the bone is visible, then you should call 911 instead.

    Call 911 if the child is not responsive.

    There are many reasons why a child may lose consciousness and not respond to attempts to rouse him or her. Parents should assume that this is a medical emergency that requires a call to 911 . Unresponsiveness can be the result of a serious infection, severe dehydration, head trauma, or poisoning.

    Drive to the ER for sutures.

    If your child has sustained a wound that you suspect will require stitches, you can generally drive to the ER. If possible, have someone else drive so that you can keep pressure on the wound. If the wound is bleeding severely, you are unable to stop the bleeding with pressure, or your child has a bleeding disorder, it’s time to call 911.

    Sunrise Children’s Hospital is pleased to offer our dedicated neonate and pediatric ambulance to facilitate rapid emergency care to children in the Las Vegas area. If your child is experiencing a serious medical problem, please don’t hesitate to call 911. Parents can contact our children’s hospital at (702) 233-5437 only for non-emergent questions.

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